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I am a teacher for a mod/severe SDC class and have grown to become incredibly interested in how and why my student's minds are processing information the way they do, as well as their reactions to various learning stimulus and environments.

I am trying to get as much of a sense of the world of a neuropsychologist as possible to determine if this is truly what I want to do, and all the information and insight I can learn from is very appreciated.

What is being a neuropsychologist like? What are the demands? What resources are out there for someone like myself who is trying to get more information, and a general idea of the work environment and what to expect in terms of researching and working with people one-on-one.

Any response will be happily received.

Sincerely,
Jennifer

 

Reply
A neuropsychologist is clinical psychologist who specializes in brain behavior relationships, and understanding what part of the brain affects specific functioning. They typically assess using a hypothesis approach, meaning they do not always know what assessment tools they will use until they begin working with the individual and see the results that lead them to other assessment tools.

As far as where they are typically employed, there are a variety of settings. They can be found in hospitals on the rehabilitation units, specifically to address the needs of survivors from acquired brain injury including TBI, stroke, brain tumors, encephalitis, AVM, Meningitis, etc. Many are in private practice, and may assess individuals with ADHD and LD, as well as ABI. Others may contract part time with rehabilitation facilities, and some may also contract with school districts, and although rare, it is happening more today than in previous years. Many school districts are now encouraging their school psychologists to obtain a school neuropsychology certificate which is another avenue. There are NOT enough neuropsychologists who specialize in pediatrics, and certainly even fewer who have the training and experience as a special educator which would be an invaluable skill to have going in.

As far as who to ask, I would encourage you to inquire about the program at UCLA. However, there are a number of neuropsychologists who would be happy to assist with any questions you may have. Look up Dr Roger Light in Manhattan Beach, as he is well versed in pediatric and adult assessment and is affiliated with UCLA.

Sharon Grandinette, MS, CBIST
www.helpingkidsbrains.com

 

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